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What do you know about increasing Social Security disability?

You are a disabled older adult, and you need financial support to make ends meet. While you qualify for Social Security Disability, could you qualify for even more than you think?

U.S. News & World Report describes ways to increase SSD checks. Take steps to ensure that you receive every penny of assistance that you have a right to.

Submit a thorough application

Rather than generalities, note specifics on your disability application. Specifically, note how your disability limits your daily life, your physical range of motion and your general life satisfaction. You can ask your physician to help you describe your diagnosis and its effects on your body.

Research your qualifications

As an older adult who worked several years before becoming disabled, you likely paid a substantial amount in Social Security taxes over the years. The Social Security Administration allows you to see an estimate of your disability benefits. Use the feature to get an idea of how much you can expect to receive each month, which also helps you design your budget.

Look into supplemental assistance

You could qualify for more than SSD. Receiving food stamps can help offset the cost of keeping your pantry stocked, or you could qualify for a free phone. Applying for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program could help reduce your energy costs. If you do not own your current residence or have trouble keeping up with homeownership costs, affordable housing programs could help.

Keep the SSA updated on your disability

Once you start receiving disability, the SSA may check in on you from time to time to determine if you still qualify for benefits. Do your part to help by informing the administration if your disability improves or worsens.